Things that every homeowner should know

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CPVC



Quite a few years ago now, cpvc was a new, efficient, and effective means of distributing potable water. Although it is still used in many parts of the country, it has fallen out of favor as compared to a while back.

Cpvc speeds up installation time as compared to copper and other means of water distribution. It has the most benefits in new home construction given its normally long curing time.

Cpvc pipe and fittings are connected by means of approved glue and primer. Most primers are rated for cpvc, but check that the glue is rated as such, because most of your standard pvc glue is not rated for cpvc and requires special glue.

The procedure for connecting cpvc is the same as regular pvc. Especially in colder climates that are prone to freezing, cpvc can be particularly disadvantageous. If the water line freezes to the point of bursting, copper normally leaves a small slit in the pipe that can be cut out and replaced. Cpvc on the other hand, frequently shatters the pipe, leaving a crack from fitting to fitting and longer. If a building with cpvc is left to freeze up, the entire water distribution system may very well need to be replaced.

Free Online Plumber does not warrant any of the information on this page, in regards to the accuracy or effectiveness of these procedures or this information. Always check and follow all applicable local plumbing codes.
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