Things that every homeowner should know

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Showers

Showers have many similarities to tub/shower combinations. They can be made of fiberglass or tiled completely. A quick search on the internet and you can see many gorgeous, eye-popping designs of showers. Many have solid glass doors with glass walls, and very elaborate tile work. The sky is the limit when it comes to showers and bathroom designs.

The shower assembly to the left is a piece by piece kit. This was required in this bathroom due to the door clearance.

The one thing that showers don't usually have is a tub spout. There is, of course, nothing from stopping you installing one, but since the shower doesn't hold water, there really is no need for one. It could also get in the way in smaller showers.

Fiberglass showers come in quite a few different sizes, as well as straight and corner varieties. Check with you local supplier to see what's available.

The main piece that is different is the drain connection known as a shower foot.

As with all of the standard drain connectors, plumbers putty is used between the lip of the shower foot and the top surface of the shower floor. Below gets the rubber washer installed against the shower, then the friction ring and then the nut. Remove the excess putty that squishes out after the foot is tightened down.

As for the pipe connections, there is the standard glue style connection. All shower connections are designed to have 2" pipe connected to them, so 2" pvc would get glued directly into the shower foot.

The other version in the picture above is a rubber compression style. The rubber is tapered, so when the plastic nut(the ring) gets tightened, the rubber gets pushed against the pipe.

The compression ring gets tightened from the top, inside the shower. You can see, in the above picture, the black bar tightening tool. It also has a screwdriver slot.

The one potential problem with showers is that if the shower foot loosens up, the nut is almost always sheetrocked in the ceiling. This is obviously a serious mess just for a nut! There's not much you can do about it, but caulking the top of the foot, inside the shower can buy you some time until the foot needs to be repaired.

Free Online Plumber does not warrant any of the information on this page, in regards to the accuracy or effectiveness of these procedures or this information. Always check and follow all applicable local plumbing codes.
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