Things that every homeowner should know

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Bath Tubs

The bathtub/shower combination is one of the most popular styles of bathing units out there. They normally use the same type of faucet as straight showers as well. To see our faucet section click here.

Most tubs are 5ft long. This is designed to be the width at the studs, not the sheetrock wall. The tubs are designed to be screwed fast to the studs at the top of the tub walls. They have a nailing strip for this. The sheetrock or the tile then goes over this nailing strip to conceal it.

5ft is the standard measurement, but there are smaller tubs available if necessary.

Tubs come in either left-side or right-side drain outlets depending on which way it needs to be. The faucet is almost always mounted in the same side of the tub as the drain. The hole/s will have to be drilled for the faucet.

Complete tubs come in either 1, 2, or 3 piece designs. The 1 piece is the tub and walls all together. The two piece is the tub and a "U" shaped piece, all three walls on one piece. The 3 piece splits the walls into 2 pieces. The 2 and 3 piece designs are very helpful for getting the new tub into homes with tight quarters.

Many thinner floored tubs need extra support underneath them. Check with the supplier. If the supports are required, but not put in, the floor could very easily crack, causing the entire tub to have to be removed again.

The one part of a tub/shower combination that needs to be addressed is the drain connection, known as the tub foot.

The tub foot is an overflow assembly as well. The riser pipe will also take excess water down the drain in the event that the tub gets overly full. The stopper to keep the water in the tub while taking a bath is a part of the tub foot as well.

The connections are 1 1/2" slip-joint and are adjustable. The horizontal tube can be cut if necessary, but the top one being cut too far could make the stopper assembly unusable.

This is definitely one job that is really a two person job! It has been done by one person, but with a great amount of aggravation and time. The horizontal tube gets a rubber washer(in the photo) underneath the tub, while the chrome threaded insert, with plumbers putty applied, get screwed down into it. The easiest method for tightening the chrome insert is with two screwdrivers inserted against the cross-braces in a "cross pattern". Turning the screwdrivers against one another in a clock-wise direction until it is snug. Putty will squeeze out the sides. Pull the excess putty off when the chrome insert is tight.

The "U" shaped piece of metal by the outlet of the riser tube is to hold the riser tube in place. The large foam washer goes in back of the tub to prevent water from leaking out of the tub during overflow.

The chrome cover/lever assembly gets connected to the stopper linkage by means of a cotter pin. This allows the lever to move the stopper up and down.

Adjusting the stopper linkage can be somewhat of a chore. First step is to simply connect it and insert the stopper into the riser tube. It is almost always far too high to get the cover anywhere near the screw holes. You then have to guess the height that needs to be reduced by screwing the linkage further in, making it shorter.

Adjusting the linkage can take quite a few tries to get to the correct position. If it's adjusted a bit too short, when the stopper is down, water will leak out, causing the water to empty out of the tub. If it's too long, the drain will be slow due to the stopper not fully opening. Good luck!!

Free Online Plumber does not warrant any of the information on this page, in regards to the accuracy or effectiveness of these procedures or this information. Always check and follow all applicable local plumbing codes.
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